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Sunday, March 13, 2011

Dems gamble in MA

Dems are taking a gamble for the support of independents in 2012 by trying to take a hit at Romney:

BOSTON -- President Barack Obama and other top Democrats have lavished praise on former Massachusetts Republican Gov. Mitt Romney for signing the health care law in 2006 that laid the groundwork for Obama's national health care overhaul.

Democrats are hoping to taint Romney by tying him too closely to a highly unpopular law among GOP voters.

But some analysts are wondering if Democrats are stretching, especially if Romney wins the Republican nomination for president and has to reach out to independents and moderate Democrats.

I give the Dem leadership a lot of credit. It must take a lot of "creative writing" to praise RomneyCare. I direct you to a March 16, 2010 article in the Wall Street Journal:

While Massachusetts' uninsured rate has dropped to around 3%, 68% of the newly insured since 2006 receive coverage that is heavily or completely subsidized by taxpayers. ... More than half of the 408,000 newly insured residents pay nothing. ... Another 140,000 remained uninsured in 2008 and were either assessed a penalty or exempted from the individual mandate because the state deemed they couldn't afford the premiums.... One third of state residents polled by Harvard researchers in a study published in "Health Affairs" in 2008 said that their health costs had gone up as a result of the 2006 reforms. A typical family of four today faces total annual health costs of nearly $13,788, the highest in the country. Per capita spending is 27% higher than the national average.

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  1. If you really want the cost of anything to skyrocket, insure it. Is it any coincidence that the cost of dental care skyrocketed once insurance was made available for it? Now basic dental care is largely unaffordable and insurance doesn't cover the expensive services anyway.

    Get the government out of it other than to perform its constitutional duty of maintaining fair and honest competition and costs will go down.

  2. This is the one upside of having Romney in the primaries... constant reminders of the failures of RomneyCare.

  3. "Our approach was a state plan intended to address problems that were in many ways unique to Massachusetts," Romney said. "Our experiment wasn't perfect. Some things worked. Some didn't. And some things I'd change.

    "One thing I would never do is to usurp the constitutional power of states with a one-size-fits-all federal takeover," Romney said.

    Hello, too F@#$ING late!

    I have posted the reality of my healthcare premium nightmares here in past posts.

    My DH (nudge nudge) decided to re-enter the MA job market, after being laid off from a Fortune 500, 8 mos ago, and doing contract work since and risked his current pay level to gamble for a better health plan and benefits in a new position. I am grateful to say that are going from $400X26 $5000.00 deductible to $249x26 $250 deductible. But....

    We sold our souls to the devil for $4000.00.

    No, We didn't but changing jobs with 2 children in college and no security is gamble enough to keep us from sleeping peacefully. I am not alone.

    I am one of Mitt Romney's experiment and it sucks!

  4. "I direct you to a March 16, 2010 article in the Wall Street Journal:"

    The classical usage is "I invite your attention to a March 16, 2010 article in the Wall Street Journal:"

    And technically off topic but reflecting also a more courteous age, classical usage is "who" rather than "that." This reflects a view of people as persons rather than as things. For example: The man who [not "that"] went to the lake for a stroll came upon his friend who [not "that"] had been at the county fair the previous evening.